Thursday, July 31, 2014

Teens ban on tanning goes nowhere

In the same week the U.S. Surgeon General called for immediate action to reduce the rate of skin cancer, the North Carolina General Assembly failed to act on a bill that would have banned the use of tanning beds by teens.

The Youth Skin Cancer Protection was OK'd by the North Carolina House of Representative last year by a vote of 94-22, and dermatologists across the state had hoped the Senate would follow suit.

"It's a sad irony that we received the news about North Carolina tanning bed bill the same week as the U.S. Surgeon General issued a national call to action on skin cancer," said Dr. Brent Mizelle, president of the North Carolina Dermatology Association. "We are disappointed that North Carolina teens will not be among those who enjoy this protection."

Eleven states have prohibited minors from using tanning beds.

Similar legislation has been opposed by the American Suntanning Association, a group of tanning salon owners whose website says they are "dedicated to taking immediate action to correct misconceptions about sunbed salons in the press, the medical community and in state and federal government bodies." 

Earlier this week, acting Surgeon General Dr. Boris Lushniak said no previous surgeon general has ever said "UV radiation is bad for you; protect your skin."

"We have to change the social norms about tanning," he said. "Tanned skin is damaged skin, and we need to shatter the myth that tanned skin is a sign of health."

The report was released just two months after the Food and Drug Administration said it would require manufacturers to put warnings on tanning beds, cautioning against their use by anyone under the age of 18. 


Skin cancer is on the rise, according to the American Cancer Society, with more cases diagnosed annually than breast, prostate, lung and colon cancer cases combined.

Nearly 5 million people are diagnosed and treated for skin cancer each year. From 1973 to 2011, the rate of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, increased more than 200 percent, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.



6 comments:

Anonymous said...

"We are disappointed that North Carolina teens will not be among those who enjoy this protection."

Uh, they will if they CHOOSE not to go.

Aren't you libs supposed to be "pro-choice"?

Archiguy said...

Sometimes, as with cigarettes, seat belts, and mandatory motorcyclist helmets, people need to be protected not only from themselves, but from having their future enormous medical bills becoming a drain on society.

Skin cancer kills, and it's on the rise. There's no "misconception" about that. The owners of tanning salons fall into the same moral category as the CEO's of tobacco companies.

We can't get rid of them, but we can and should reign them in as much as possible. Especially with young people whose cerebral cortex isn't yet developed enough to ensure their own self-preservation.

Anonymous said...

Yes, and if you use a ball point pen as a weapon you can kill someone, so maybe we should outlaw teens from using ball point pens? You know at a certain point we need to afford people a good education and let them make up their mind about how they lead their own lives. I understand the desire to help others but those who are able need to be able to make their own decisions about how they want to live their life.

Ghoul said...

Archiguy,

At what age does the liberal's cerebral cortex come of age where they can think for themselves without Govco holding their hand, 90?

Al said...

The ironic thing is that the American Suntanning Association actually SUPPORTED this bill. It's baffling why the senate merely removed it from the budget bill. I'm in agreement with Archiguy...this bill would not only protect our children (drinking...smoking...etc...it's been done before) but also reduce future medical costs. The price for a couple month's dosage to treat melanoma? Over $30,000! I now...my brother died of melanoma on 2010.

obat kanker ginjal ace maxs said...

I absolutely agree with you that the natural urge to find pattern, create novel order, and similar inherent characteristics of sentience are what minds will do, free of struggling with the evolutionary and developmental conflicts you analyze so clearly.