Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Support breastfeeding now

Because breastfeeding is a key to improving infant mortality rates and child health, N.C. health officials have created a special designation to recognize hospitals and birthing centers that do a good job of supporting mothers who breastfeed their infants.

Don't they all do that, I asked. Apparently not.

The state's Nutrition Services website lists 10 steps each maternity center should follow to win the five-star "breastfeeding-friendly designation."

The steps include giving newborns no food or drink other than breastmilk (unless medically indicated) and allowing mothers and infants to remain together (rooming-in) all day long.

“We know that infants who are breastfed benefit in many ways – through improved immunity to disease, reduced likelihood of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and in lower rates of childhood obesity,” said State Health Director Dr. Jeff Engel. “Our goal is to create a climate where nursing mothers are supported in their choice to breastfeed their children.”

State policy requires all government agencies to provide space, privacy and time for nursing mothers to pump breast milk. For example, at the N.C. Division of Public Health’s main Raleigh campus, a room has been furnished specifically for nursing mother’ use.

For ideas on becoming a breastfeeding friendly workplace or applying for the breastfeeding-friendly designation, see http://www.nutritionnc.com/breastfeeding/index.htm.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Our hospitals do need to do a better job at this. I gave birth at CMC in '08 and '10. In '08 I had requested a lactation consultant beginning from my later term pre-natal appointments, when I 'checked- in' (I was induced) and right after I gave birth. Never saw any LC throughout my stay, and none of the nurses offered any help or assistance with breastfeeding. I gave up pretty quickly because it just didn't work for me. In '10 I went into labor 2 weeks early, but when I got into my room, I requested to be put on the LC list to be seen. (got to hospital at 8pm, had baby at 10:56 that night), I understand if the LC only work during the days, so I figured I would ask for one in the morning again. I asked my nurse to check on when the LC would come see me that morning. asked the whole day through. It wasn't until the next day, more than 36 hours after I gave birth, did a LC come see me. Spent a total of 15 minutes with me, she gave up on me; even said she would be back to try again- never did see her again before I was released. Gave up shortly after coming home trying to get it to work. Moms need better support for breastfeeding.

Andy said...

The steps include giving newborns no food or drink other than breastmilk (unless medically indicated) and allowing mothers and infants to remain together (rooming-in) all day long.


What if you don't want your newborn to drink breast milk?

MichaelProcton said...

Andy:
In that case, you should probably choose a hospital where they also want to ignore the sensible medical advice to do so.